What Are The Common Diseases That Affect The Elderly?

Introduction

As we age, our bodies become additionally vulnerable to unwellness. The most common diseases that affect the elderly are heart disease, stroke, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and diabetes. While there is no way to completely prevent these diseases, there are steps we can take to reduce our risk. Some risk factors for developing these diseases are out of our control, such as age and family history.

However, lifestyle choices like diet and exercise can make a big difference in our health as we age. Quitting smoking and getting vaccinated are also important preventive measures. By following these simple tips, we can help keep ourselves healthy as we age and enjoy a better quality of life.

The most common diseases that affect the elderly.

Heart disease:

Heart disease is the leading explanation of death for men and ladies in the U.S. Every year, about 610,000 individuals die of cardiovascular disease in this country. Heart disease is often called a “silent killer” because it can develop without causing any noticeable symptoms. However, some risk factors increase your chances of developing heart disease, including age, family history, high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, and obesity.

Stroke:

Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the United States after heart disease, killing nearly 130,000 Americans every year. A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that supplies oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts. This deprives the brain of vital oxygen and nutrients, which can damage or kill brain cells. There are two types of strokes: ischemic (caused by a clot) and hemorrhagic (caused by a ruptured blood vessel).

Cancer:

Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide after heart disease, killing an estimated 9.6 million people in 2018 alone. Cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the body divide and grow out of control. There square measure many alternative sorts of cancer, every with its own set of symptoms and treatment choices. The most common types of cancer include breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer, and skin cancer (melanoma).

Alzheimer’s disease:

Alzheimer’s disease may be a variety of insanity that affects memory, thinking, and behavior. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and affects more than 5 million Americans over the age of 65 years old. Alzheimer’s disease progressively gets worse over time and eventually leads to death. There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease currently available but there are treatments that can help manage some of the symptoms associated with it.

Diabetes:

Diabetes mellitus type 2, the most common form is 90-95%, characterized by insulin resistance. With type 2 diabetes, your pancreas still produces insulin, but not enough to keep your glucose at normal levels. About 5 – 10 % have type 1 diabetes characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas due to autoimmune reactions.

Type 2 diabetes usually develops slowly over time. You may not notice any signs or symptoms for years. This makes it hard to know if you have it. Type 2 diabetes can lead to serious health problems including blindness, kidney failure, heart attack, stroke, and amputation.

Risk factors for developing these diseases.

Age:

As we age, our bodies become less efficient at repairing damage and more susceptible to disease. The elderly are also more likely to have chronic health conditions that can increase the risk of developing certain diseases.

Family history:

Your risk for developing a disease is increased if you have a family history of the disease. For example, if your parents or grandparents had heart disease, you are more likely to develop the disease yourself.

Lifestyle choices:

Certain lifestyle choices can increase your risk of developing a disease. For example, smoking cigarettes increases your risk of developing lung cancer, while being overweight increases your risk of developing diabetes.

Prevention is the key to a healthy life.

Healthy diet:

The best way to prevent the most common diseases that affect the elderly is to eat a healthy diet. A healthy diet includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and limited amounts of saturated and trans fats, salt, and sugar. Eating a healthy diet can help reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and diabetes.

Regular exercise:

Regular exercise is another important way to prevent the most common diseases that affect the elderly. Exercise helps to improve cardiovascular health, control weight, and reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and diabetes. aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity on most days of the week. If you are unable to do this much exercise, even small amounts of physical activity can be beneficial.

Quit smoking:

Smoking is a major risk factor for developing many chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, and lung disease. If you smoke cigarettes or use other tobacco products, quitting is the best thing you can do for your health. There are many resources available to help you quit smoking including counseling services, support groups, nicotine replacement therapies, and medications.

Get vaccinated:

Getting vaccinated is another important way to prevent the spread of disease. Vaccinations help protect people from serious illnesses such as influenza, pneumonia, and shingles. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone 6 months of age and older get a flu vaccine every year.

Conclusion

Prevention is the key to a healthy life, especially as we age. By making simple lifestyle choices and being aware of our risks, we can greatly reduce our chances of developing common diseases that affect the elderly. So let’s take care of ourselves, eat right, exercise, and get vaccinated!